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C34 on Monitoring Technology

Special Committee on Peacekeeping (C34) welcomes the “Tools of the Trade” report 

The UN’s Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations is composed of 124 states who are past or current contributors to UN peacekeeping operations. Created in 1965, the Committee is mandated to conduct a “comprehensive review of all issues relating to peacekeeping.”  It meets annually in “substantive” sessions. In 2007, the UN’s Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO) tabled Dr. Dorn’s study “Tools of the Trade: Monitoring and Surveillance Technologies in UN Peacekeeping” with the C34. Dr. Dorn also presented an oral brief to the C34 on the report’s main conclusions (PPT available here). The C34 in its 2007 consensus report to the UN General Assembly welcomed the study with the following words. (Bold-font and underlining has been added to certain keywords for ease of scanning.)

 

2007 C34 Report (UN Doc. A/61/19)

“45. The Special Committee welcomes the study launched by the Secretariat on the use of advanced monitoring and surveillance technologies to tangibly improve operational capabilities, achieve results in the field and promote the safety and security of peacekeeping personnel. Recognizing the urgent need for Peacekeeping Operations to standardize the use of advanced technology, particularly in missions operating in dangerous environments or mandated with challenging tasks, the Special Committee requests the Secretariat to develop appropriate modalities for the use of advanced monitoring and surveillance technologies with due attention to legal, operational, technical and financial considerations as well as the consent of the countries concerned with regards to their application in the field.

 “46. The Special Committee calls on the Secretariat to engage in the utilization of advanced monitoring and surveillance technologies where appropriate, particularly in more dangerous missions, and present a report to the C-34 in its next session on the steps taken by the Secretariat towards achieving these ends and any further suggestions for consideration by the Special Committee. The Special Committee encourages dialogue among member states and between member states and the Secretariat to meet the objectives stated above.”

 

In subsequent years, the C34 continued to pursue the issue, including the following paragraphs in its annual reports.

 

2008 Report  (UN Doc. A/62/19)

“50. The Special Committee requests the Department of Peacekeeping Operations to present a progress report to it before its 2009 substantive session on the use of advanced monitoring and surveillance technologies in United Nations peacekeeping operations. The Special Committee continues to request the Secretariat to develop appropriate modalities for the use of advanced monitoring and surveillance technologies with due attention to legal, operational, technical and financial considerations as well as the consent of the countries concerned with regard to their application in the field.”

 

2009 Report (UN Doc. A/63/19)

“42. The Special Committee notes the progress made towards a wider and systemic use of technology in peacekeeping operations. However, the Special Committee believes further progress is required. In this regard, the Special Committee requests the development of a United Nations policy on monitoring and surveillance technology, and looks forward to a report on this subject within six months of the issuance of this Committee’s findings. The Special Committee believes that due attention should be given to legal, operational, technical and financial considerations and especially the consent of the countries concerned with regard to their application in the field.”

 

2010Report (UN Doc. A/64/19)

“43. The Special Committee notes the progress made towards a wider and systemic use of technology in peacekeeping operations. However, the Special Committee believes further effort in this direction is required. In this regard, the Special Committee requests the Secretariat to continue its work towards the finalization of the draft policy for the use of monitoring and surveillance technology in the field missions, and looks forward to a report on this subject within six months of the issuance of this Committee’s 2010 report. The Special Committee looks forward to considering the legal, operational, technical and financial considerations contained in the report and especially the element of the consent of the countries concerned with regard to the application of such means in the field.”

 

 

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